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20121202
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speaking to then president bill clinton back in 1994 about the bosnian war, which at that point was going into its third year and had claimed tens of thousands of lives. >> as leader of the free world, as leader of the only superpower, why has it taken you, the united states, so long to articulate a policy on bosnia? why in the absence of a policy have you allowed the u.s. and the west to be held hostage to those who do have a clear policy, the bosnian serbs, and do you not think that the constant flip-flops of your administration on the issue of bosnia sets a very dangerous precedent and would lead, other strong people, to take you less seriously than you would like to be taken? >> no, but speeches like that make them take me less seriously than i'd like to be taken. there have been no constant flip-flops, madam. >> so is this a question that we should be asking the obama administration about syria? >> well, you remember, randi, that president clinton was really angry with me when i was asking that question from sarajevo. the fact of the matter is the question didn't prompt intervention
.6% rate of the clinton years? he did not. so is there a little give ultimately to sort of say what if it doesn't go up to 39.6%, but say 37%, is that something the white house would accept? also, this that same interview, the president raised the possibility, which is that after you do tax reform and you close loopholes and deductions, that if the rate is raised, the top rate, there's always a possibility that after you do tax reform, of course, the top rate would then go down again. so it was -- you have to listen to the president very carefully to see where there might be some give. the problem from my point of view is that everybody knows what's got to be done in the long-term. it's the question of the short-term deal. >> john boehner, speaker of the house, he came up with a proposal. but not all the conservatives in the house and the senate are on board. jim demint, republican senator from south carolina. >> this is a time to negotiate with ourselves. we need to invite the president to work with us. his proposal was so outlandish, i don't think we should go back to the table un
.s. secretary of state hillary clinton is going to be meeting with her russian counterpart, sergey lavrov. this is a meeting that's going to take place in dublin later today. this is an effort to try to get the peace plan for syria back on track, a u.n. effort that's stalled for so many months now. there's not a lot of hope it will get back on track anytime soon. a lot of international powers and pressure being put on syria to try to comply with some sort of peace plan so this nightmare scenario doesn't come to any sort of fruition. zoraida? >> all right, we're talking about a deadly nerve gas, it is sarin. can you tell us what kind of damage could this do to the people there? >> reporter: it's well known that sarin and the use of sarin is a nightmare scenario. the use of it could kill a huge amount of people in a very short amount of time. now, last night, a former cia officer, robert bear, was speaking to anderson cooper. he described what the use of sarin could do. here's more of what he had to say. >> one round and the dispersion on that could be -- depends on the wind -- but you coul
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3